Classes

    FRSEMR 30G - Digging Egypt's Past: Harvard and Egyptian Archaeology

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Peter Der Manuelian
    Tues. 12:45 PM - 2:45 PM
    Emerson Hall 318

    Mysterious pyramids, colossal royal statues, tiny gold jewelry, decorated tomb chapels, temples, settlements, fortresses, and hieroglyphic inscriptions. This was the excavation legacy in Egypt and Sudan of Egyptologist George Reisner (1867–1942).

    ... Read more about FRSEMR 30G - Digging Egypt's Past: Harvard and Egyptian Archaeology

    GENED 1091 - Classical Chinese Ethical and Political Theory

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Michael Puett
    Mon. and Wed. 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM
    CGIS South S010

    What is the best way to live a fuller and more ethical life? Concretely what should we do to begin to live in a more flourishing and inspiring way? Questions such as these were at the heart of philosophical debates in China. The answers that classical Chinese thinkers developed in response to these questions are among the most powerful in human history. Regardless of whether one agrees with them...

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    GENED 1093 - Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Cares? Reimagining Global Health

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Profs. Arthur Kleinman, Salmaan Keshavjee, Anne Becker, and Paul Farmer
    Tues. and Thurs. 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM
    Science Center Hall B

    If you are sick or hurt, whether you live or die depends not only on biological factors, but social ones: who you are and where you are, what sort of healthcare system is available to help you survive, and what kind of care is available to help you recover, if society believes you deserve it.

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    ANTHRO 2738 - Remaking Life and Death

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Anya Bernstein
    Tues. 12:45 PM - 2:45 PM
    Tozzer 102

    This course is a critical reading graduate seminar focusing on how defining the boundaries between life and death became a matter of profound political, cultural, and scientific debate. Guided by the concepts of bio- and necropolitics, we will explore the shifting relations between body and person, human and time, and technology and biology while attending to the changing political, biomedical and religious contexts.

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    GENED 1105 - Can We Know Our Past?

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Profs. Rowan Flad and Jason Ur
    Mon. and Wed. 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM
    CGIS South S010

    What happened in the past? How do you know? Even though today we take great pains to document every major event that occurs, more than 99% of human history is not written down. How, then, can we determine with any certainty what people did, let alone thought about, hundreds, thousands, and even millions of years ago?

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    GENED 1044 - Deep History

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Profs. Matthew Liebmann and Daniel Smail
    Tues. and Thurs. 1:30 PM - 2:45 PM
    Harvard Hall 202

    When does history begin? To judge by the typical history textbook, the answer is straightforward: six thousand years ago. So what about the tens of thousands of years of human existence described by archaeology and related disciplines? Is that history too?

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    ANTHRO 1208 - Prehistoric Technology: Ancient China

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Rowan Flad
    Tues. and Thurs. 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM
    Peabody 561

    In this course we examine prehistoric technology through the lens of case studies from Chinese archaeology. We will begin with a focus on general concepts in the archaeology of technology. After providing this thematic foundation, we explore specific examples of technologies that have become a focus of archaeological attention in China: lithics, ceramics, plant and animal domesticates, architecture, hydrological engineering, textiles, metallurgy, divination technology and writing.

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    ANTHRO 2250B - Proseminar in Archaeology

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Jason Ur
    Thurs. 9:00 AM - 11:45 AM
    Peabody 12

    This graduate seminar reviews critical issues in archaeological approaches to the study of complex societies, including writing, trade, craft specialization, technology, landscape, urbanism, and political organization.

    ANTHRO 1182 - People of the Sun: The Archaeology of Ancient Mexico

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Jenny Carballo
    Mon. and Wed. 12:00 PM - 01:15 PM
    Peabody 12

    Course video

    This course provides a broad overview of the archaeology of ancient Mexico and Central America, focusing on the Indigenous cultures of highland Mexico such as the Aztecs and Zapotecs, as well as their predecessors and contemporary descendants.... Read more about ANTHRO 1182 - People of the Sun: The Archaeology of Ancient Mexico

    ANTHRO 1033 - Archaeology of Inequality

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Jess Beck
    Tues. and Thurs. 1:30 PM - 2:45 PM
    Peabody 561 

    In 2018, Oxfam reported that the 26 richest people on the planet had the same net worth as half of the global population. The rampant wealth disparities in the modern world lead us to ask whether inequality is an inescapable component of all societies. Through its unique access to the deep time of human prehistory, archaeology allows us to question myths and just-so stories about the origins and inevitability of inequality.... Read more about ANTHRO 1033 - Archaeology of Inequality

    ANTHRO 2812 - Space and Power

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Ajantha Subramanian
    Tues. 9:45 AM - 11:45 AM
    Tozzer 203

    This course considers space as a structuring principle of social life and as a product of political activity. It treats space as a dynamic force animating human existence rather than as its static backdrop.

    ANTHRO 1906 - Care in Critical Times

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Andrea Wright
    Thurs. 12:00 PM - 2:45 PM
    Eliot House T-29

    What is care? How can and do communities mobilize care as a social intervention, political act, and tool for building intimacy, healing, and hope? Now, more than ever, it is imperative that we care for ourselves and our communities, but caring is not an apolitical or individual act and we must analyze the inherent inequalities and social dimensions of what it means to give and receive care.

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