Classes

    GENED 1126 - Race and Caste

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Prof. Ajantha Subramanian
    Tues. and Thurs. 1:30 PM - 2:45 PM

    Race and caste are two of the most enduring forms of social stratification. While their histories date well before the advent of political democracy, they have taken on new forms in the context of democratic social transformation and capitalist development.

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    ANTHRO 97X - Sophomore Tutorial in Archaeology

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Prof. Amy Clark
    TBD 

    This course will focus on archaeological thinking, the cognitive skeleton of the discipline of archaeology, the principles and the logic that are the foundation of all archaeological conclusions and research. Central to this is an understanding of research design, archaeological theory and interpretation, culture and material culture; as well as an understanding of how to examine and construct an archaeological argument.

    This course is offered via the Archaeology track within Anthropology.

    ANTHRO 97Z - Sophomore Tutorial: Anthropology as Social Theory and the Social Theory of Anthropology

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Prof. Malavika Reddy
    TBD

    Anthropology 97z is a course about what social theory is, how to read it and how it relates to the discipline of anthropology. The course encourages students to think expansively about the sources and boundaries of theory, guiding them through three approaches to the theorization of social life: First, we work from early anthropological conceptualizations of society, culture and race to trace the impacts of these concepts on the formation of the discipline and on contemporary life, more broadly; Second, we consider the insights that a Marxist...

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    ANTHRO 1038 - Game of Stones: The Archaeology of Europe from Handaxes to Stonehenge

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Prof. Amy Clark
    TBD

    Game of Stones: The Archaeology of Europe from Handaxes to Stonehenge Buried beneath modern cities, Roman amphitheaters, and Medieval churches lie subtle traces of Europes earlier occupants: campsites littered stone tools and animal bones, human bodies preserved in bogs and frozen in ice, and cave walls decorated with extinct animals.

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    ANTHRO 1058/2076 - Bias in Archaeology

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Prof. Rowan Flad
    TBD

    This course is offered in both a graduate and an undergraduate level. Please review the course syllabus prior to enrolling in the course to determine which section to enroll in.

    ANTHRO 1131 - Archaeology of Harvard Yard II: Laboratory Methods and Analysis

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Profs. Diana Loren and Patricia Capone
    TBD

    Open to students who participated in the fall term investigations in Harvard Yard, this course focuses on the detailed analysis of the materials recovered in the excavations, within the context of archival and comparative archaeological and historical research.

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    ANTHRO 1135 - Challenging Collections: Critical Reflections on Collecting Through Harvard’s History

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Profs. Diana Loren, Ilisa Barbash, and Ingrid Ahlgren
    TBD

    Harvard's museum collections have often been used to interrogate the world outside of us: peoples, events, places, and things. This course reverses that gaze and asks what the collections and the processes of collecting reveal about the history of Harvard and its institutional identity as the place of learning.

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    ANTHRO 1716 - Neoliberalism: Empire, Extraction, and the Making of the Global Social Order

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Profs. Salmaan Keshavjee, Jason Silverstein, and Lindsey Zeve
    TBD

    This course is designed primarily for advanced undergraduates and graduate students who are interested in the relationship between neoliberalism, the global social order, and inequities in health and wellbeing.

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    ANTHRO 3628 - Anthropological Research Methods

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Prof. Kaya Williams
    TBD

    This course offers a conceptual overview of research methods used by anthropologists. We will hear from faculty members their experience of doing fieldwork—from formulating a research question, choosing a site, entering the field to ethical issues they face in the field. Students will not only learn about but also practice these various methods and reflect on their projects in lights of the discussion about methods. To that end, students will complete several exercises and craft a method paper for their own project.

    This...

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    FRSEMR 44J - Clash of Titans, Seats of Empire: The Aztecs, Toltecs, and Race of Giants in Ancient Mexico

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Prof. Bill Fash
    Wed. 9:45AM - 11:45AM

    The film "Clash of Titans" was a British extravaganza dedicated to exploring the ancient Greeks' concepts of the interactions between humans and their gods. In Ancient Mexico, the tale of Topiltzin Quetzalcóatl, Toltec Prince of Tula is the best-known example of the intervention of rival gods in the affairs of kingdoms and empires. His tale and what was made of it by the Aztecs, and Spaniards, serves as the point of departure for our seminar. Just as the Greeks countenanced sacrifices and political assassinations, in Ancient Mexico the three great empires practiced human sacrifice, regicide, and warfare which was vital in their statecraft and economy.

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    GENED 1099 - Pyramid Schemes: What Can Ancient Egyptian Civilization Teach Us?

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Prof. Peter Der Manuelian
    Mon. and Wed. 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM

    How much of your impression of the ancient world was put there by Hollywood, music videos, or orientalist musings out of the West? How accurate are these depictions? Does it matter? This course examines the quintessential example of the “exotic, mysterious ancient world” – Ancient Egypt – to interrogate these questions. Who has “used” ancient Egypt as a construct, and to what purpose? Did you know that pyramids, mummies, King Tut, and Cleopatra represent just the (overhyped) tip of a very rich civilization that holds plenty of life lessons for today?

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    GENED 1128 - The Conduct of Life in Western and Eastern Philosophy

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Prof. Michael Puett
    Thurs. 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM

    A study of approaches in the philosophical traditions of the West and the East to the conduct of life. Philosophical ethics has often been understood as meta-ethics: the development of a method of moral inquiry or justification. Here we focus instead on what philosophy has to tell us about the first-order question: How should we live our lives?

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