Classes

    ANTHRO 1182 - People of the Sun: The Archaeology of Ancient Mexico

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Jenny Carballo
    Mon. and Wed. 12:00 PM - 01:15 PM
    Peabody 12

    Course video

    This course provides a broad overview of the archaeology of ancient Mexico and Central America, focusing on the Indigenous cultures of highland Mexico such as the Aztecs and Zapotecs, as well as their predecessors and contemporary descendants.... Read more about ANTHRO 1182 - People of the Sun: The Archaeology of Ancient Mexico

    ANTHRO 1208 - Prehistoric Technology: Ancient China

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Rowan Flad
    Tues. and Thurs. 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM
    Peabody 561

    In this course we examine prehistoric technology through the lens of case studies from Chinese archaeology. We will begin with a focus on general concepts in the archaeology of technology. After providing this thematic foundation, we explore specific examples of technologies that have become a focus of archaeological attention in China: lithics, ceramics, plant and animal domesticates, architecture, hydrological engineering, textiles, metallurgy, divination technology and writing.

    ... Read more about ANTHRO 1208 - Prehistoric Technology: Ancient China

    ANTHRO 1603 - The Law and Its Limits: Anthropological Approaches to Law

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Malavika Reddy
    Tues. 12:00 PM - 2:45 PM
    Tozzer 203

    We often talk about the power of law to shape our worlds but what about its powerlessness? An axiom of contemporary life is that societies need law to address social, political and environmental ills. Yet, in the face of entrenched problems, including expanding who belongs, tackling inequality, and confronting environmental crisis, law often appears impotent or, worse, detrimental.... Read more about ANTHRO 1603 - The Law and Its Limits: Anthropological Approaches to Law

    ANTHRO 1610 - Ethnographic Research Methods

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Kaya Williams
    Wed. 3:00 PM - 5:45 PM
    Tozzer 203

    Introduction to methodology for contemporary ethnographic field research in anthropology. Students complete assigned and independent research projects relying on a variety of ethnographic methods, under supervision of department faculty.

    Open to undergraduates only.

    ANTHRO 1906 - Care in Critical Times

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Andrea Wright
    Thurs. 12:00 PM - 2:45 PM
    Eliot House T-29

    What is care? How can and do communities mobilize care as a social intervention, political act, and tool for building intimacy, healing, and hope? Now, more than ever, it is imperative that we care for ourselves and our communities, but caring is not an apolitical or individual act and we must analyze the inherent inequalities and social dimensions of what it means to give and receive care.

    ... Read more about ANTHRO 1906 - Care in Critical Times

    ANTHRO 2250B - Proseminar in Archaeology

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Jason Ur
    Thurs. 9:00 AM - 11:45 AM
    Peabody 12

    This graduate seminar reviews critical issues in archaeological approaches to the study of complex societies, including writing, trade, craft specialization, technology, landscape, urbanism, and political organization.

    ANTHRO 2643 - Paperwork: What Does Paper Do for Social Life?

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Malavika Reddy
    Thurs. 9:00 AM - 11:45 AM
    Tozzer 203

    How does paper work in contemporary life? This course approaches this question by focusing on the paperwork, files, and record keeping practices of three organizational forms – bureaucracy, the corporation, and the nation-state. The aim of the class is for students to develop, in relation to their research sites and questions, a media theory of paperwork, a conceptual toolkit to make visible and to theorize an often-overlooked form. Tacking among ethnography, history and social theory, this course examines how paperwork – from forms, reports and memoranda to identity papers, receipts and business cards – mediate and materialize the collective projects that produce them. What is the relation of power and paper, and how might this question help us locate and understand the mundane materiality of social life?   

    ... Read more about ANTHRO 2643 - Paperwork: What Does Paper Do for Social Life?

    ANTHRO 2656 - Introduction to Feminist Science Studies

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Anna Jabloner
    Wed. 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM
    Peabody 12

    This seminar is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of feminist science studies. As the feminist movements of the 1970s began to change the American political landscape, academic feminists began inquiries into the marginalization of women in science a debate philosopher Harding called the woman question in science. Feminist scientists began to examine sex, gender and race bias in their own disciplines.

    ... Read more about ANTHRO 2656 - Introduction to Feminist Science Studies

    ANTHRO 2738 - Remaking Life and Death

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Anya Bernstein
    Tues. 12:45 PM - 2:45 PM
    Tozzer 102

    This course is a critical reading graduate seminar focusing on how defining the boundaries between life and death became a matter of profound political, cultural, and scientific debate. Guided by the concepts of bio- and necropolitics, we will explore the shifting relations between body and person, human and time, and technology and biology while attending to the changing political, biomedical and religious contexts.

    ... Read more about ANTHRO 2738 - Remaking Life and Death

    ANTHRO 2812 - Space and Power

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    Prof. Ajantha Subramanian
    Tues. 9:45 AM - 11:45 AM
    Tozzer 203

    This course considers space as a structuring principle of social life and as a product of political activity. It treats space as a dynamic force animating human existence rather than as its static backdrop.

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